5 Sayings to Help You Practice

Here are 5 sayings for you that might just help you practice and play better!

1. The more you play, the better you get.

2. The more mindfully you play, the faster you get better.

3. It’s not the minutes that count, but the consistency.

4. It’s not how many minutes, but how much you care.

5. If you like it, play it again; if you don’t like it, don’t play it the first time.

If you’d like some brief commentary on each of these sayings (plus a special sixth saying), read on!

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fiddle-online for Advanced and Professional Players

If you are an advanced, even a professional player, there are many uses you can make of the fiddle-online.com site! Below, we’ll take a look at what you can get out of the following offerings —

  • Concert/workshops with world-class guests in various fiddle styles
  • Advanced ideas about bowing, ornaments, and stylistic timing
  • Audio and video about various fiddle styles
  • Articles on the blog, many of which have food for thought for advanced players and teachers
  • Technique videos which can fill in gaps or provide new perspectives
  • Teaching support in the form of techniques, concepts, tunes, and styles

Read on for details!

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10 Motivators for Practicing

Practicing trains our muscles, our ears, our mind to work together. No commander can get much done with untrained or unprepared troops.

The problem is that progress that might be made in a single practice session is not always noticeable. Here are some ways to encourage practicing, drawn from a variety of sources.  Some are good for kids (or the kid in all of us), some for all ages.

Here are 10 ideas for motivating your practice:

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Troubleshooting 6 – More Left Hand!

One of the main culprits causing fiddling to sound out of tune is the 2d finger. It wants to be next to the third finger; that’s its natural place. When we have to place it next to the 1st finger, and far from the third, it’s awkward but definitely doable, by everyone, if they think about it and teach their muscle memory the right way. Those who don’t want to think about it tend to throw the 2d finger down somewhere between 1st and 3d, and that apathy has a price — it turns everything a bit sour on the account of just one or two notes.

Note about “TechVid” videos mentioned below — they refer to the  technique video groups available on fiddle-online.com.  There are ten videos in each group.  You can work with them in real-time or at your own pace to make use of the exercises while being reminded of what to aim for.  Written descriptions are only a rough sketch of what to do.  In fact, often videos are not even enough — many times I’ve seen people not really discover the personal context for using these exercises until they had a lesson.  If you want this kind of help, a one-off  online lesson can be arranged via the Credit Store.

Below are suggestions for handling or preventing the following problems:

  • Trouble playing low 2d finger
  • Trouble playing low 1st finger
  • Not immediately sure which way is higher/lower
  • Trouble playing fingers individually, especially 2d and 3d

Continue reading Troubleshooting 6 – More Left Hand!

Joining in a Session

In the last article we talked about hosting a multi-level session.  Let’s take a look at how to participate in a session, however it’s being hosted.  If it is a multi-level session of the type I described in the last article, it’s no problem for you to participate.  All you’ll really want to have ready is some tune that you like and know how to start, so that when it’s time for you to jump in, you know what to do.  You might want to have two tunes in mind, in case one of them was recently played already.  You’ll be able to start it at the tempo you like.

The most important trick to starting a tune at a session is to make its rhythm clear.  Even if people know the tune, they can’t join in with you until they figure out what kind of tune it is — jig, reel, strathspey, air, waltz.  For others to know, you have to know, and convey, the rhythm.  Regardless of your level as a player, you can certainly choose a reliable session tune for yourself, and know the type of tune, the title, and the key.  True, many session players don’t know these things, but if you just have a tune or two ready to pitch in to the group, it’s not so hard to look up and remember a few things about it.  It can help accompanists if you call out the key, and helps melody players to know the name of the tune if they ask afterwards.

To play with good rhythm depends on knowing the beat notes.  All you really must do to feel comfortable starting a tune at a session is

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Hosting a fun Multi-level Session

[Interrupting our troubleshooting articles — there will be a couple more articles about the left hand later — first, let’s take a look this month at hosting and playing in sessions.]

Most fiddling is very sociable — playing with others in a session, at a ceilidh, for dancers, providing support for a community function such as a wedding or funeral.  Even in the extreme situation such as an intense fiddle competition, you’re judged primarily on whether your spirit and sense of the tradition is convincing, and the audience is with you, not agin’ ya.

One of the best ways to get comfortable with fiddling as a participatory and sociable activity is through sessions.  Let’s talk here about hosting a good session, and next time about how a player can fit in to any session.

The ideal session is a repeat event with a fairly consistent group of players that get to know each other and their repertoire.  But every session, even such an “ideal” group, has to deal with players with different levels and experiences.

Here are some ideas for hosting a successful and fun multi-level session.

Continue reading Hosting a fun Multi-level Session

Troubleshooting 5 — Left Hand

We’ve been troubleshooting physical and bowing problems.  Now we’ll turn our attention to the left hand in this and several upcoming articles.

About videos — the “TechVid Groups” mentioned below refer to the  technique videos available on fiddle-online.com.  There are ten videos in each group.  You can work with them in real-time or at your own pace to make use of the exercises while being reminded of what to aim for.  Written descriptions are only a rough sketch of what to do.  In fact, often videos are not even enough — many times I’ve seen people not really discover the personal context for using these exercises until they had a lesson.  If you want this kind of help, a one-off  online lesson can be arranged via the Credit Store.

Below are suggestions for handling or preventing the following problems:

  • Playing out of tune/Not sure where to put fingers
  • Playing too slowly/Reluctant fingers
  • Notes not coordinating with bow
  • Trouble with fourth finger

Continue reading Troubleshooting 5 — Left Hand

Troubleshooting 4 — More Bow Control! (2 of 2)

In our last article we discussed ways to improve your bow control, especially if it’s getting in your way sometimes.  Here are a few more tips on that subject.

About videos — the “TechVid Groups” mentioned below refer to the  technique videos available on fiddle-online.com.  There are ten videos in each group.  You can work with them in real-time or at your own pace to make use of the exercises while being reminded of what to aim for.  Written descriptions are only a rough sketch of what to do.  In fact, often videos are not even enough — many times I’ve seen people not really discover the personal context for using these exercises until they had a lesson.  If you want this kind of help, a one-off  online lesson can be arranged via the Credit Store.

Below are suggestions for handling or preventing the following problems:

Troubleshooting 3 — Bow Control Problems (1 of 2)

In our last article we did some troubleshooting for annoying sounds and how to stop or prevent them.  This time, and in the next article, we’ll continue troubleshooting bowing but focus on restrictions you may feel while trying to use the bow.  Your bow is your voice, where all your timing and music come from.  Bow control is at the heart of enjoying your playing.

About videos — many of the exercises described below correspond to technique videos available on fiddle-online.com.  These videos allow you to work in real-time or at your own pace to make sure you learn and make use of the exercises while being reminded of what to aim for.  They can be very helpful because verbal descriptions are only a rough sketch of what to do.  In fact, often videos are not even enough — I’ve had many students discover that it takes a personal context to apply these ideas to their own playing.  If you feel this way, a one-off  online lesson can be arranged via the Credit Store.

Below are suggestions for handling or preventing the following problems:

  • Problems with timing or coordination between left & right hands
  • Rough bow changes and disconnected notes
  • Trouble playing near the frog
  • Weak or noisy start to your notes

Continue reading Troubleshooting 3 — Bow Control Problems (1 of 2)

Troubleshooting 2: Sound Problems

In the last article we talked about building awareness of your right hand and use of the bow that can help you diagnose your own troubles when you make sounds you don’t like or for times when you don’t quite feel in control of the bow.  This time we’ll get specific about troubles that happen and what you can do to help fix or prevent them.  We’ll start here with troubleshooting the making of annoying sounds, and in the next article, we’ll focus on troubleshooting bow control and physical restrictions you might be feeling about your use of the bow.

About videos — many of the exercises described below correspond to technique videos available on fiddle-online.com.  These videos allow you to work in real-time or at your own pace to make sure you learn and make use of the exercises while being reminded of what to aim for.  They can be very helpful because verbal descriptions are only a rough sketch of what to do.  In fact, often videos are not even enough — I’ve had many students discover that it takes a personal context to apply these ideas to their own playing.  If you feel this way, a one-off  online lesson can be arranged via the Credits Store.

Keep in mind that squeaks, scratches, and other weird sounds happen to everybody.  The worst thing you could do is to stop playing in the middle of a tune and try to fix these sounds, first of all because unless they are a regular occurrence, they are just a mistake, not a flaw; and second, because by disrupting the continuity and timing of a tune just to chase after a stray sound (or even a wrong note), you may well have hurt your playing with a worse mistake than the one that’s already water under the bridge.  Make a mental note about the problem, and see if it happens again in the same place (this helps build awareness and is a great performance skill).  If it does, there may be a technical problem to address — a trouble to shoot!

Below are suggestions for addressing and preventing the following problems:

  • squeaks
  • scratches
  • whistles
  • shaky bow or inconsistent sound
  • thin or timid sound

Continue reading Troubleshooting 2: Sound Problems